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Alum Rock Regional Park (San Jose)

This is one of the oldest city of San Jose parks and hosts covers 13 miles of trails open to hikers including six miles of horse trails and three miles of dirt bicycle trails.  The park is located within Alum Rock Canyon and covers both shaded trails and trails more open to the sun.  Plant and animal life include holly leaf cherry tree, sagebrush, sycamore, maple, white alder, red willow, different types of oak trees, Madrone, California buckeye, toyon, wild rose, sticky monkey flower, wild blackberries, black tailed deer, brush rabbits, quail, red-tailed hawks, turkey vultures, Stellar jays and bobcats.  There is water and restrooms throughout the park including trail entrances (but not along the trails).

Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge (San Jose)

The Wildlife refuge hosts over 280 species of shorebirds and waterfowl as well as other wildlife.  It covers 30,000 acres and a variety of habitats including open bay, salt pond, salt marsh, mudflat, upland and vernal pool.  There many miles of dirt trails throughout the refuge.  Trails are open to hikers and bicycles with some trails used by dogs. There is a visitor center with educational exhibits.

Hellyer County Park Coyote Creek Parkway (San Jose)

Hellyer County Park is 354 acres with Coyote Creek running through the middle of the park.   The visitor center has natural history displays. The creek channel is home to many different species of wildlife. There is also a one mile self guided nature trail located along the Coyote Creek that offers information about the local flora, fauna and wildlife.  There are multiple restrooms throughout the park.  Water is not available so please bring your own.

Penitencia Creek County Park (San Jose)

Penitencia Creek County Park is a 78 acre park with a four-mile trail that follows Penitencia Creek The trails are used by hikers, bikers and equestrians. There is a pond that is a stop on the migratory flyway.  There are multiple restrooms along the trail.